Hard to Fit Contacts

Contact lenses are a great alternative to eyeglasses. Not only do they give you a more natural appearance, but you won't need to worry about choosing frames or dirty lenses obstructing your view. Also, if you are an athlete or an active person, contact lenses are much more convenient. Most people can wear traditional soft contacts; however, there are certain conditions of the eye that make this impossible. Fortunately, Dr. Gregory K Wacasey in Longview can fit you with a pair of hard to fit contacts.

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When Hard to Fit Contacts Are Needed

Several conditions can make it impossible to wear traditional soft lenses. These include:

  • Dry eye syndrome: Dry eye is a relatively common condition. It occurs when your eyes don't produce enough tears or enough quality tears to keep them properly lubricated. Traditional lenses can make your symptoms worse.
  • Astigmatism: An astigmatism is characterized by a misshapen eyeball.
  • Presbyopia: This condition occurs after the age of 40, and it affects your ability to see close up.
  • Keratoconus: This condition occurs when your cornea isn't strong enough to hold its shape and it budges into a cone shape.
  • Giant papillary conjunctivitis: This form of conjunctivitis causes red bumps to develop under your eyelids. It causes heavy discharge and excessive tearing.

Types of Hard to Fit Contacts

There are a few different types of hard to fit contacts on the market. The one that your optometrist chooses will depend on a few factors, including the condition you have.

  • Gas-permeable contacts: This is the most common hard to fit lens. They are rigid and don't bend to fit your eye the way that soft lenses do. This makes these lenses a good option for keratoconus and astigmatism. Also, proteins don't adhere to them like soft lenses, and they are a good option for giant papillary conjunctivitis.
  • Piggyback contacts: Piggyback contacts are when you wear a soft lens under your gas-permeable lens to act as a cushion. These are prescribed by an optometrist for patients who cannot get used to gas-permeable lenses.
  • Scleral contacts: Scleral contacts rest on the white parts of your eye rather than directly over the cornea. These are a great option for dry eye syndrome and keratoconus.
  • Toric lenses: Toric contacts are designed for astigmatism.
  • Bifocal lenses: Bifocal lenses have two prescriptions and are prescribed for presbyopia.
  • Monovision: Monovision is when you wear a contact in one eye for distance and a contact in the other eye for a closeup. These are often prescribed by an optometrist for patients who cannot get used to bifocal contacts.

Eye Care in Longview, TX

Just because you have an eye condition that makes you hard to fit for contacts, it doesn't mean that you can't wear them. Dr. Gregory K Wacasey in Longview can fit you with the best contacts for your condition. To schedule an appointment for an eye care visit, give us a call today at (903) 663-1550.

Location

Hours of Operation

Monday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday

8:00 am - 4:00 pm

Wednesday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday

8:00 am - 4:00 pm

Friday

8:00 am - 2:00 pm

Saturday

Closed

Sunday

Closed

Monday
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Tuesday
8:00 am - 4:00 pm
Wednesday
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
8:00 am - 4:00 pm
Friday
8:00 am - 2:00 pm
Saturday
Closed
Sunday
Closed